ABOUT YOUTH & FAMILY COUNSELING

 

Youth and Family Counseling was founded in 1981 by the Police Chiefs of Lewisville, Flower Mound, and Highland Village. Their goal was to create a First Offender Program that would serve as a means to divert youthful offenders from the juvenile justice system. The founders incorporated family participation because of the evidence that many adolescents' first violations coincided with times of family stress, such as a divorce, terminal illness, job loss, or the arrival of a step parent.

 

The concept was that by using the First Offender Program, resources from the police departments, community, schools, and family could combine to address the initial causes of illegal "acting out" behaviors before crime patterns became habituated. It was determined that a combination of education and family counseling would be the most effective means to address these goals. The First Offender Program is a voluntary program that consists of six family counseling sessions provided to the families at no cost. Families may elect to continue counseling sessions at a cost of $25.00 each and approximately 40% of participating families choose to continue.

Youth and Family Counseling's First Offender Program has a proven track record of success over its 30 year history. Studies conducted by the cities of Lewisville and Highland Village show that the vast majority of participants do not get arrested a second time, and our program has been duplicated in other cities throughout the state.

In addition to the First Offender Program, Youth and Family Counseling also has a Community Referred Counseling program. Residents in the community can obtain psychological treatment for a variety of issues and receive these services at an affordable rate. Counseling is led by masters-level therapists that are either fully licensed (Licensed Professional Counselors or Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists) or are working towards their licensure. All are trained to work with a broad range of issues and have experience doing individual, family, and relationship counseling, as well as play therapy. Our agency is dedicated to offering professional counseling services comparable to those received by families who can afford expensive private practice treatment. The message to our families is that they are respected, valued, and believed to have the ability to get better within their family system. The Community Referred Counseling program has grown steadily and now accounts for almost 50% of the clients served.

After moving to our brand-new, beautiful facility in February 2013, Youth and Family Counseling has created a state-of-the-art play room to provide play therapy to children ages 4 to 12. We have therapists trained in working with young children, and we are able to provide these services on the same sliding scale rates as our other counseling services.

Youth and Family Counseling is a 501(c)3 non-profit agency controlled by a Board of Directors made up of civic leaders in the community. The majority of the center's funding comes from the cities of Lewisville, Flower Mound, and Highland Village, as well as Denton County. In addition to this funding, Youth and Family Counseling has also been the beneficiary of fundraisers conducted by the Flower Mound and Lewisville Rotary Clubs, the Kiwanis Club, Highland Vilalge Women's Club, Flower Mound Women's Club, Community Action League of Lewisville, and the Highland Village Police Officers Association. 

The goal of Youth and Family Counseling is to aid the families and children of Denton County, thereby creating healthy and productive individuals, families, and communities which will benefit the quality of life for all.

At a Glance

Offering Quality Mental Health Services for All Income Levels

  • Professional
  • Compassionate
  • Confidential

Community Counseling

Mental Health and Counseling Services on a sliding scale for residents of Denton County

First Offender and At-Risk kids Program

Family Counseling for adolescents referred by area police departments, courts and schools

 


verified by Psychology Today